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Facts at a Glance

The numbers speak for themselves: Saxony has undergone noticeable changes, and the process is set to continue.

The number of inhabitants of the Free State of Saxony is continuously decreasing. While 4.9 million still called Saxony their home in early 1990, the number had fallen to just above 4.2 million by 2007. The prognosis for 2020 sees a further decline of inhabitants to approximately 3.9 million.

At the same time, the average age of a Saxon increased from 39 years in 1990 to 45 years in 2007. Experts say that the 'average Saxon' will be almost 49 years old in 2020.

The following pages provide an overview of the most important figures in terms of demographic developments in Saxony.

The Percentage of older People is steadily increasing

Inhabitants of Saxony 2006 and 2020 by age and gender; data exerpts for the year 2020 from the 4th regionalised population forecast for the Free State of Saxony, variation 3 (basic assumptions in accordance with the 11th coordinated population forecast of the Federal Statistical Office, variation 1 W1)

Inhabitants of Saxony 2006 and 2020 by age and gender; data exerpts for the year 2020 from the 4th regionalised population forecast for the Free State of Saxony, variation 3 (basic assumptions in accordance with the 11th coordinated population forecast of the Federal Statistical Office, variation 1 W1)
(© data: Statistical State Office of the Free State of Saxony; diagram: State Chancellery of Saxony)

The population of Saxony will continue to decrease.

Population Increase only in Leipzig and Dresden

Population Increase only in Leipzig and Dresden; data exerpts for the year 2020 from the 4th regionalised population forecast for the Free State of Saxony, variation 3 (basic assumptions in accordance with the 11th coordinated federal population forecast)

Population Increase only in Leipzig and Dresden; data exerpts for the year 2020 from the 4th regionalised population forecast for the Free State of Saxony, variation 3 (basic assumptions in accordance with the 11th coordinated federal population forecast)
(© data: Statistical State Office of the Free State of Saxony; diagram: State Chancellery of Saxony)

The Saxon counties and the county borough Chemnitz will lose inhabitants by 2020, while slight increases in population can be expected for the cities Dresden and Leipzig.

Saxony's Population is decreasing

The population of the Free State of Saxony 1990 to 2020

The population of the Free State of Saxony 1990 to 2020
(© data: Statistical State Office of the Free State of Saxony; diagram: State Chancellery of Saxony)

Ratio of Generations 1990 to 2020 in Comparison

1990-2005: Population projections; 2010 to 2020: Data from the 4th regionalised population forecast for the Free State of Saxony, variation 3 [basic assumptions in accordance with the 11th coord. federal population forecast]

1990-2005: Population projections; 2010 to 2020: Data from the 4th regionalised population forecast for the Free State of Saxony, variation 3 [basic assumptions in accordance with the 11th coord. federal population forecast]
(© data: Statistical State Office of the Free State of Saxony; diagram: State Chancellery of Saxony)

The percentage of older Saxons of the whole of the population in the Free State is growing. The average age of the Saxon is increasing.

Saxony's Birth Rate is beginning to rise again

The cumulative birth rate is a clear indicator of fertility. It describes the number of children a woman would bear in her lifetime, if the age-specific fertility numbers of a calendar year apply for the time between her 16th and 50th year.

The cumulative birth rate is a clear indicator of fertility. It describes the number of children a woman would bear in her lifetime, if the age-specific fertility numbers of a calendar year apply for the time between her 16th and 50th year.
(© data: Statistical State Office of the Free State of Saxony; diagram: State Chancellery of Saxony)

Saxony's birth rate is beginning to rise again. It does however not enough to sustain population numbers naturally.

Marginalspalte


Illustration

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